Tag Archives: horse drugging

Senator: Horse Racing Should Fall Under Anti-Doping Agency

Good timing: I just received this press release from the office of Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico. He and representatives from Kentucky and Pennsylvania have drafted legislation that would put horse racing under the authority of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. You might remember them from that fellow Lance Armstrong everyone was talking about a few months ago?

From their FAQ: “USADA is the United States Anti-Doping Agency, the independent, non-governmental, national anti-doping agency for Olympic, Paralympic Pan American and Para panamerican sports in the United States.”

It’s not quite the same thing. But I like the idea nonetheless. I think the argument that they will make is that since parimutuel wagering crosses state and international borders, it’s international sport.

Or something. Anyway, here is the press release.

New Bill to End Doping of Racehorses on Horizon

Sen. Udall & Reps. Whitfield, Pitts preparing legislation to cleanup sport

WASHINGTON – Ahead of Saturday’s Kentucky Derby, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and U.S. Reps. Ed Whitfield (R-Ken.) and Joe Pitts (R-Penn.) revealed draft legislation they intend to introduce to end doping in horseracing and kick cheaters out of the sport.

The Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act would provide the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) with authority to cleanup the sport and enforce anti-doping standards in races with simulcast wagering.

USADA is a non-governmental organization that is designated as the official anti-doping agency for the U.S. Olympics and works with sports leagues to strengthen clean competition policies.

“The chronic abuse of race horses with painkillers and other drugs is dangerous and just plain wrong,” said Udall. “Racing groups have promised drug reform for decades, but this bill would bring in real standards and enforcement from an organization with a proven record for cleaning up sports.“

“This weekend, the very best of horseracing will be on display at the Kentucky Derby. Yet, for too long, the safety of jockeys and equine athletes has been neglected for the pursuit of racing profits,” stated Whitfield. “The doping of injured horses and forcing them to compete is deplorable and must be stopped. Despite repeated promises from the racing industry to end this practice, meaningful action and oversight has yet to come forth. This legislation would bring much-needed reforms to an industry that supports thousands of jobs and is enjoyed by spectators nationwide.”

“Last year, I chaired a hearing that took a deep look into the problems of both legal and illegal drugs in horseracing,” said Pitts. “We heard testimony about how abuse of drugs is killing horses and imperiling riders. Before more people and animals are hurt, we need to put a responsible national authority in charge of cleaning up racing. This is a sensible, bipartisan measure to restore trust in racing and protect lives.”

Horseracing showcases the beauty of an iconic American animal. The industry also has a $10 billion annual economic impact and sustains about 380,000 jobs nationwide. Last year, over $10.8 billion was wagered on American horseracing, including $133 million for the Kentucky Derby. However, as the New York Times reported in 2012, doping undermines the safety and viability of the sport, and twenty-four horses die each week from racing injuries.

Under the new legislation, USADA would develop rules for permitted and prohibited substances and create anti-doping education, research, testing and adjudication programs for horseracing. It would also:

  • Put an end to race day medication;
  • Set a harmonized medication policy framework for all races with interstate simulcast wagering;
  • Require stiff penalties for cheating, including “one and done” and “three strikes, you’re out” lifetime bans for the worst cases; and
  • Ensure racehorse drug administrations comply with veterinary ethics.

Last year, Udall, Whitfield and Pitts participated in Congressional hearings that explored medication and performance enhancing drug problems in horseracing.

In previous years the lawmakers introduced similar legislation tasking the Federal Trade Commission to improve the sport. Their new approach, however, would enable USADA to act as the anti-doping body without amending the Interstate Horseracing Act or involving any federal agency or regulation. The legislation would not require any federal taxpayer funds.

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Udall: Times Investigation Paints Disturbing Picture of Horseracing Industry

Press Release from the office of Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 26, 2012
Udall: Times Investigation Paints Disturbing Picture of Horseracing Industry

WASHINGTON – Following an in-depth report by The New York Times on the state of horseracing in the United States, U.S. Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) issued the following statement:

 

“The findings uncovered in The New York Times investigation about horseracing in the United States, and New Mexico in particular, paint a very disturbing picture of the industry.

“The sport of horseracing which, at its best, showcases the majestic beauty of this animal and the athleticism of jockeys, has reached an alarming level of corruption and exploitation. The consequence of inconsistent state-level regulation is an epidemic of animal doping that has lead to countless euthanizations of helpless horses and the injury and death of their riders.

“The Times exposé has shined a glaring light on the need for national standards in a sport that reaps gambling profits, but has lacked proper oversight for decades.

“I urge our leaders in Congress to advance the bipartisan legislation Congressman Ed Whitfield and I have introduced in both chambers to renew the sport of horseracing and set minimum, nationwide standards for medication and doping. The Interstate Horseracing Improvement Act would kick cheaters out of the sport. The horseracing industry has promised voluntary reforms for decades, but as we’ve painfully observed, our legislation is the only viable way to address doping problems plaguing the sport.

“Now is the time to end the unscrupulous practices of those trainers and track veterinarians in horseracing who abuse these magnificent animals and endanger jockeys for gambling profits.”

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